• Dare to Lead by Brené Brown

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Brené Brown has taught us what it means to dare greatly, rise strong, and brave the wilderness. Now, based on new research conducted with leaders, change makers, and culture shifters, she’s showing us how to put those ideas into practice so we can step up and lead.

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  • UnSelfie by Dr. Michele Borba

    UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World. Hailed as “an absolute must-read” (Jean Twenge) and a book that “will change your kids’ lives” (Jack Canfield), UnSelfie by Dr. Michele Borba explains what parents and educators MUST do to combat the growing empathy crisis among children today—including a 9-step empathy-building program with tips to guide kids from birth through college, and beyond.

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  • Creative Confidence by David & Tom Kelley

    IDEO founder and Stanford d.school creator David Kelley and his brother Tom Kelley, IDEO partner and the author of the bestselling "The Art of Innovation", have written a powerful and compelling book on unleashing the creativity that lies within each and every one of us.

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  • Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover

    An unforgettable memoir in the tradition of The Glass Castle about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University.

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  • Leading Well by Lucy Calkins

    In Leading Well: Building Schoolwide Excellence in Reading and Writing, Lucy Calkins draws on the transformative work that she and her colleagues at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project have done in partnership with school leaders over the last thirty years. This book, like the work of the TCRWP itself, is deeply research-based and principled, while also absolutely practical and real-world tested.

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  • School Leader's Guide to Tackling Attendance Challenges by Jessica and Randy Sprick

    This comprehensive guide provides school and district-level administrators and teams with the background information, strategies, and tools needed to implement a multitiered approach to improving attendance and preventing chronic absence. The authors use the results of their work in schools throughout the United States to dispel the myth that educators have little control over student attendance and provide success stories from elementary and secondary schools that have reversed longstanding patterns of absenteeism.

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